COPLAC Shared Courses: A New Approach to the Liberal Arts Classroom

As the higher education landscape evolves, both students and faculty seek learning experiences that go beyond the traditional classroom. Why not share resources and expertise to enrich the education of your students?

Over the years, COPLAC has developed several grant-funded course sharing projects. COPLAC Digital, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and COPLAC Hybrid Course Sharing, funded by the Teagle Foundation, offer students at COPLAC schools the opportunity to experience a different approach to their liberal arts education. Both initiatives use technology to advance the educational experience, while maintaining the interpersonal connections that students enjoy at liberal arts colleges. Learn more about these initiatives and how your students can take advantage of these opportunities below.

COPLAC Digital

COPLAC Digital will produce student work that is collaborative and outward-facing and that demonstrates the value of a liberal arts education at a time when it is under attack. By combining digital fluencies with the research-based, critical thinking approach of public liberal arts institutions, these multi-campus, undergraduate research seminars help advance students who are adaptable and prepared for graduate school and the working world.

High-impact experiences like COPLAC Digital take them further into the reality of the workplace in the 21st century, a fast-changing professional landscape that requires the team-based habits of mind and practices at the core of the liberal arts experience. This project is scalable both within COPLAC and across the liberal arts college sector, and we look forward to sharing project outcomes with colleagues at liberal arts institutions nationwide.

Upcoming Spring 2017 Courses

DIGITAL HISTORY & COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
TUESDAY & THURSDAY | 11AM–12:15PM EST

DIVIDED HOUSES: SECESSION & SEPARATION 
MONDAY & WEDNESDAY | 1–2:15PM EST

MAKING STRANGE: CONSTRUCTING IDENTITIES & MAKING SENSE OF OUR SURROUNDINGS
WEDNESDAY & FRIDAY | 3:30–4:45PM EST

THE SOCIAL LIFE OF BOOKS
TUESDAY & THURSDAY | 12:30–1:45PM EST

Faculty and administrators from all COPLAC campuses are encouraged to nominate students for COPLAC Digital Courses. Nominations will be accepted until Friday, October 14th, 2016. Nominate students here

Please contact Leah Tams at ltams@umw.edu or visit coplacdigital.org for more information. 

Hybrid Course Sharing in Native American Studies

Hybrid Course Sharing in Native American Studies expands the range of curricular offerings and explores the educational value of sharing online and hybrid courses in the area of Native American Studies.

The shared courses in Native American Studies come from a variety of academic departments and programs. The partner institutions build a multi-campus community of faculty expertise and practice, develop and share courses that expand curricular options on each campus, and offer students the opportunity to study under faculty experts from other COPLAC campuses.

In addition to the online course component, enrolled students on each of the seven campuses will be mentored by home campus faculty members or partnered with home campus seniors majoring in American Indian Studies. This combination of online instruction and “on the ground” face-to-face advisement constitutes the unique hybrid nature of the course experience.

Upcoming Spring 2017 Courses

AMERICAN INDIAN LAW AND PUBLIC POLICYMichael Oberg Headshot MONDAY, WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY | 12:30–1:20PM EST
Michael Oberg, SUNY Geneseo
This course will provide you with an overview of the concept of American Indian tribal sovereignty, and the many ways in which discussions of sovereignty and right influence the status of American Indian nations.

 

RESEARCH: NATIVE AMERICAN FRONTIERSDaniel Mandell HeadshotAsynchronous online
Daniel Mandell, Truman State University
This course will discuss a series of readings that examine the history of Native-colonial relations from first encounters to the present. You will then set up, research, and write a history essay using a range of primary sources.

 

 

TOPICS IN CANADIAN HISTORY: ORAL HISTORY Daniel Sims headshotAsynchronous online
Daniel Sims, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus
This course considers oral traditions as aspects of broader, culturally- defined systems of knowledge, in which stories are vehicles for encoding and transmitting knowledge about the people, their culture, and their history.

 

 

Faculty and administrators from the following COPLAC campuses are encouraged to nominate students for Hybrid Courses in Native American Studies: Eastern Connecticut State University, Truman State University, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus, University of Minnesota Morris, University of North Carolina Asheville, University of Wisconsin Superior, and State University of New York Geneseo.

Please contact Emma Anderson at emma@coplac.org for more information.

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